tempestsarekind: (i am my father's daughter [elizabeth])
(Yes, I am now just scrolling through the Arden website to see what's in the pipeline. Shut up.)

Oliver Ford Davies wrote a book on fathers and daughters in Shakespeare, and it comes out in June!
http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeares-fathers-and-daughters-9781350038462/

I am of course interested in this topic anyway (I gave a conference paper on it a couple of years ago), but it makes me especially happy that my favorite Polonius wrote about it.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
While I was watching bits and pieces of all those Hamlets, my mind snagged on a bit of Ophelia's description of Hamlet when he bursts in on her as she's sewing in her closet:

And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell
To speak of horrors
,--he comes before me.

And there's Hamlet, acting like his father, searching for yet another mode of action. So I just wondered--has anyone ever done a production of Hamlet in which Hamlet borrows some gesture of the ghost's, here, and uses it with Ophelia, in much the same way that David Tennant's Hamlet borrows the Player King's Pyrrhus-gesture of raising a knife over his head in both hands, during both "O what a rogue and peasant slave am I" and "Now might I do it, pat"? You could do this quite easily in film, in flashback; I'm not sure how you'd do it on stage, unless Ophelia were to echo Hamlet's echoed gesture, either on her own self or on Polonius. Which would work, I think. They're all borrowing from one another, anyway--trying to figure out how to behave in this broken kingdom.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
While I was watching bits and pieces of all those Hamlets, my mind snagged on a bit of Ophelia's description of Hamlet when he bursts in on her as she's sewing in her closet:

And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell
To speak of horrors
,--he comes before me.

And there's Hamlet, acting like his father, searching for yet another mode of action. So I just wondered--has anyone ever done a production of Hamlet in which Hamlet borrows some gesture of the ghost's, here, and uses it with Ophelia, in much the same way that David Tennant's Hamlet borrows the Player King's Pyrrhus-gesture of raising a knife over his head in both hands, during both "O what a rogue and peasant slave am I" and "Now might I do it, pat"? You could do this quite easily in film, in flashback; I'm not sure how you'd do it on stage, unless Ophelia were to echo Hamlet's echoed gesture, either on her own self or on Polonius. Which would work, I think. They're all borrowing from one another, anyway--trying to figure out how to behave in this broken kingdom.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
I have strange mental reflexes.

Yesterday I managed to time my walk home from campus so that it was right in the middle of a torrential downpour (which ended about a minute after I'd gotten indoors). I'm walking home, wringing wet, wincing at every slap of cold denim against my legs and marveling at how much more my jeans weigh when they're wet, when I burst out laughing, because suddenly all I can think is "her garments, heavy with their drink..."

This is not an appropriate reaction, for a whole host of reasons, really.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
I have strange mental reflexes.

Yesterday I managed to time my walk home from campus so that it was right in the middle of a torrential downpour (which ended about a minute after I'd gotten indoors). I'm walking home, wringing wet, wincing at every slap of cold denim against my legs and marveling at how much more my jeans weigh when they're wet, when I burst out laughing, because suddenly all I can think is "her garments, heavy with their drink..."

This is not an appropriate reaction, for a whole host of reasons, really.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
Does anyone know of any articles about performing Ophelia, or about various performances of Ophelia, besides Frances Barber's piece in Players of Shakespeare 2? I like that piece a lot, but I'd like to have something to play off of it, too. I was thinking that maybe Ophelia comes up in Clamorous Voices, but I can't seem to find a table of contents online. There's always "Representing Ophelia," I suppose, but I'd like something more specifically about performance.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
Does anyone know of any articles about performing Ophelia, or about various performances of Ophelia, besides Frances Barber's piece in Players of Shakespeare 2? I like that piece a lot, but I'd like to have something to play off of it, too. I was thinking that maybe Ophelia comes up in Clamorous Voices, but I can't seem to find a table of contents online. There's always "Representing Ophelia," I suppose, but I'd like something more specifically about performance.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
A website devoted to Millais' Ophelia, should I want to find it again:

http://www.tate.org.uk/ophelia/

This painting always makes me think of my English teacher, senior year of high school, who had a reproduction of this painting on one of the walls in her classroom. I was totally fascinated by it, before we'd actually gotten around to reading Hamlet. Periodically I wonder what effects that had on my reading of the play... Though I do remember, quite clearly, watching Branagh's Hamlet in class that same year and being astonished by how very much Kate Winslet looked like she'd come straight out of a painting by the PRB.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
A website devoted to Millais' Ophelia, should I want to find it again:

http://www.tate.org.uk/ophelia/

This painting always makes me think of my English teacher, senior year of high school, who had a reproduction of this painting on one of the walls in her classroom. I was totally fascinated by it, before we'd actually gotten around to reading Hamlet. Periodically I wonder what effects that had on my reading of the play... Though I do remember, quite clearly, watching Branagh's Hamlet in class that same year and being astonished by how very much Kate Winslet looked like she'd come straight out of a painting by the PRB.
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
Which most of you probably are, but:

http://www.inthemedievalmiddle.com/2008/12/personals-for-fictionally-forlorn.html

(Personal ads to characters who have met with bad ends.)

(Maybe I do need that tag for "morbidity" now?)
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
Which most of you probably are, but:

http://www.inthemedievalmiddle.com/2008/12/personals-for-fictionally-forlorn.html

(Personal ads to characters who have met with bad ends.)

(Maybe I do need that tag for "morbidity" now?)
tempestsarekind: (peddlers of bombast)
Sometimes when I can't sleep, my brain gets up to the strangest things. Like my newfound conviction that the world needs a movie called Funeral Crashers, in which Hamlet and Horatio, well, crash funerals (there is totally precedent for this, right?) and inveigle their way in by pretending to be related to the deceased, whereupon they would hang about making comments about how we were all going to be food for worms anyway in the end, and the food was good, but wasn't this very stuff just served at that wedding they'd just gone to?

Because I have PROBLEMS.

Rachel McAdams could reprise her role as Ophelia/love interest from S&A/Wedding Crashers, but I can't decide who should play the dynamic duo of the melancholy Dane and my Elizabethan boyfriend. It would be a dark romantic comedy--Hamlet meets Ophelia at her dad's funeral, falls in love, things are going along just fine (he gives her presents, takes her to a play)--till whoops, she finds out Hamlet isn't what he seems and is in fact the guy who killed her dad, and she goes a bit crazy. How will it end? Will the last funeral Hamlet crashes be Ophelia's? Can the course of true love ever run smooth with all those headstones in the way?

So that was fun. The nightmare I had when I finally *did* get to sleep, about being trapped in a post-nuclear apocalypse? Not so much.
tempestsarekind: (peddlers of bombast)
Sometimes when I can't sleep, my brain gets up to the strangest things. Like my newfound conviction that the world needs a movie called Funeral Crashers, in which Hamlet and Horatio, well, crash funerals (there is totally precedent for this, right?) and inveigle their way in by pretending to be related to the deceased, whereupon they would hang about making comments about how we were all going to be food for worms anyway in the end, and the food was good, but wasn't this very stuff just served at that wedding they'd just gone to?

Because I have PROBLEMS.

Rachel McAdams could reprise her role as Ophelia/love interest from S&A/Wedding Crashers, but I can't decide who should play the dynamic duo of the melancholy Dane and my Elizabethan boyfriend. It would be a dark romantic comedy--Hamlet meets Ophelia at her dad's funeral, falls in love, things are going along just fine (he gives her presents, takes her to a play)--till whoops, she finds out Hamlet isn't what he seems and is in fact the guy who killed her dad, and she goes a bit crazy. How will it end? Will the last funeral Hamlet crashes be Ophelia's? Can the course of true love ever run smooth with all those headstones in the way?

So that was fun. The nightmare I had when I finally *did* get to sleep, about being trapped in a post-nuclear apocalypse? Not so much.
tempestsarekind: (princess elizabeth)
I am the worst Renaissance student in the world. We're supposed to be doing The Faerie Queene tomorrow in lecture (or Book I and Canto 12 of Book II, anyway), which means that on Monday I shall have to teach it...but I have a fear of Spenser that is only equalled by my fear of Milton. How dare I claim kinship with the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?!? And how am I supposed to pretend I am an expert on this text next week when I have been dancing around the reading of it (except Book III, of course, because that is where the cool cross-dressingy stuff happens) for the last two years?

I mean, really. I went to my office today to try to get some reading done in FQ, and somehow wound up reading The Spanish Tragedy in avoidance.

Also, poor Spanish Tragedy. People would like you so much more if it weren't for Hamlet. But now, alas, you are the Jan Brady of revenge tragedies with plays within plays and mad/not mad protagonists. Also, you were written by a narc. "That's totally not my blasphemy, you guys! Marlowe, like, left it here." Not that I blame him, of course.

I do worry that I have nothing substantive to say about The Spanish Tragedy, though (as I doubt that "Kyd was a narc" or "Hieronimo's mad againe," or even "Bel-Imperia, the active Ophelia," will suffice for my field exam). I suppose I should go read some criticism of the play to make up for this, if I'm not going to behave and actually read Spenser like a responsible person.
tempestsarekind: (princess elizabeth)
I am the worst Renaissance student in the world. We're supposed to be doing The Faerie Queene tomorrow in lecture (or Book I and Canto 12 of Book II, anyway), which means that on Monday I shall have to teach it...but I have a fear of Spenser that is only equalled by my fear of Milton. How dare I claim kinship with the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?!? And how am I supposed to pretend I am an expert on this text next week when I have been dancing around the reading of it (except Book III, of course, because that is where the cool cross-dressingy stuff happens) for the last two years?

I mean, really. I went to my office today to try to get some reading done in FQ, and somehow wound up reading The Spanish Tragedy in avoidance.

Also, poor Spanish Tragedy. People would like you so much more if it weren't for Hamlet. But now, alas, you are the Jan Brady of revenge tragedies with plays within plays and mad/not mad protagonists. Also, you were written by a narc. "That's totally not my blasphemy, you guys! Marlowe, like, left it here." Not that I blame him, of course.

I do worry that I have nothing substantive to say about The Spanish Tragedy, though (as I doubt that "Kyd was a narc" or "Hieronimo's mad againe," or even "Bel-Imperia, the active Ophelia," will suffice for my field exam). I suppose I should go read some criticism of the play to make up for this, if I'm not going to behave and actually read Spenser like a responsible person.

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