*flail*

Mar. 26th, 2015 12:43 pm
tempestsarekind: (amy and her boys)
While I was browsing in the bookstore the other day, I came across a book in the Shakespeare section called Poor Tom. Since - as the tag says - Edgar is my very best favorite, I picked up the book, expecting it to be on vagrancy or something.

But it is apparently an entire book, by Simon Palfrey, about Edgar! Oh, my heart.
http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo18241294.html

I managed not to buy it then and there…but I did check it out from the university library even though I have no time right now to read it, because what if someone else checked it out first?

...yup.

Dec. 3rd, 2011 11:33 pm
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
So I still have totally irrational keysmash feelings when someone declares that Edgar is dull and conventional at the beginning of the play--which is a frustrating thing to hear or read because Edgar hardly has anything to do at the beginning of the play! It's not really fair to make that judgment--but I guess anyone who isn't actively scheming must be dull. Ugh.

And you guys know that my general feeling toward villainous characters is something like *epic yawn*, but come on. Dismissing him just because he doesn't happen to be Edmund seems irresponsible.

Anyway. Edgar will always remain the best, to me, in part because he is the first one to draw our attention to a world beyond the closed world of the court. Yes, Lear gets there eventually with "poor naked wretches," and everyone talks about how important that moment is--but Edgar gets there first, with "The country gives me proof and precedent / Of Bedlam beggars" and "Poor pelting villages, sheepcotes, and mills." The more I read that soliloquy, the more I'm taken aback by that moment, and what it suggests for our understanding of Edgar--because out of everyone, he's the one who watches the world. And that's so my favorite thing: the quiet observers and listeners. (Horatio feelings in 3...2...1...) Of course he's capable of playing Poor Tom, when he needs to; he's just been storing all that away in memory.
tempestsarekind: (globe)
See, Sam Crane understands (I agree with everything except the last line, because I lean toward having Edgar rather than Albany have the last lines of the play, which means that Edgar's worldview does sort of win out, and certainly it triumphs in the duel with Edmund):

“It’s not like good prevails and evil doesn’t but Edgar is keen that there should be some kind of natural justice in this world. He tries to shape the world into his way of thinking.

“There’s one scene where he meets his father again when he’s in a state of absolute despair and wants to kill himself, so Edgar essentially conjures up a world where miracles can happen – but he’s actually having to create all this in his head, so strongly does he want it to be true.

“Ultimately though he comes to realise that this world’s not all good or evil, it’s just chaos.” (my emphasis)


http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/theatre-reviews/interview_sam_crane_1_3819830


*__*
tempestsarekind: (globe)
See, Sam Crane understands (I agree with everything except the last line, because I lean toward having Edgar rather than Albany have the last lines of the play, which means that Edgar's worldview does sort of win out, and certainly it triumphs in the duel with Edmund):

“It’s not like good prevails and evil doesn’t but Edgar is keen that there should be some kind of natural justice in this world. He tries to shape the world into his way of thinking.

“There’s one scene where he meets his father again when he’s in a state of absolute despair and wants to kill himself, so Edgar essentially conjures up a world where miracles can happen – but he’s actually having to create all this in his head, so strongly does he want it to be true.

“Ultimately though he comes to realise that this world’s not all good or evil, it’s just chaos.” (my emphasis)


http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/theatre-reviews/interview_sam_crane_1_3819830


*__*
tempestsarekind: (berowne [david tennant 2008])
One of the things I want to do in 2009 (not quite a resolution, but something similar) is to listen to more Shakespeare; the library has the entire Arkangel series as well as other individual recordings, which I should take more advantage of. So I started with King Lear, on the theory that at some point I'm planning to write on it, so it's not totally "wasted" time. Also, David Tennant is Edgar, and Edgar is my favorite thing about King Lear.

I haven't gotten very far yet. At the beginning I was quite worried I wouldn't be able to get through any of David's scenes without cracking up--though I'm not entirely sure whether that's because I'm imagining Edgar as the Doctor, or because his "Hello, my name is Edgar, and I'm a bit daft" voice is really too funny. (More the latter than the former, though, I think; sometimes a word or two sounds very Ten, but it's not that noticeable.) And I do take Edgar rather seriously, so as amused as I was by this (his "Armed, brother?" was especially funny, a bit prissy even), I don't think Edgar *is* silly, though very trusting. But I decided to listen at least through Edgar's Poor Tom speech, and I think the previous silliness pays off in that one: he sounds so surprised to find himself hunted and friendless--it's never crossed his mind, safe and unthinking as he's been, that he could ever find himself in a position like this. And bitter because of it, as the speech goes on, and he figures out his disguise. Plus the way he said "Edgar I nothing am" did break my heart a little. Interestingly, he slipped into his natural accent on "Poor Turlygod! Poor Tom!" So I'll be interested to see if he plays all of the Poor Tom stuff in that accent. I always feel like I'm missing some subtext when it comes to the associations various accents have in the UK--since I don't associate Scotland with madness--but I suppose it'll provide a way to distinguish Edgar's asides from his performance. We shall see.
tempestsarekind: (berowne [david tennant 2008])
One of the things I want to do in 2009 (not quite a resolution, but something similar) is to listen to more Shakespeare; the library has the entire Arkangel series as well as other individual recordings, which I should take more advantage of. So I started with King Lear, on the theory that at some point I'm planning to write on it, so it's not totally "wasted" time. Also, David Tennant is Edgar, and Edgar is my favorite thing about King Lear.

I haven't gotten very far yet. At the beginning I was quite worried I wouldn't be able to get through any of David's scenes without cracking up--though I'm not entirely sure whether that's because I'm imagining Edgar as the Doctor, or because his "Hello, my name is Edgar, and I'm a bit daft" voice is really too funny. (More the latter than the former, though, I think; sometimes a word or two sounds very Ten, but it's not that noticeable.) And I do take Edgar rather seriously, so as amused as I was by this (his "Armed, brother?" was especially funny, a bit prissy even), I don't think Edgar *is* silly, though very trusting. But I decided to listen at least through Edgar's Poor Tom speech, and I think the previous silliness pays off in that one: he sounds so surprised to find himself hunted and friendless--it's never crossed his mind, safe and unthinking as he's been, that he could ever find himself in a position like this. And bitter because of it, as the speech goes on, and he figures out his disguise. Plus the way he said "Edgar I nothing am" did break my heart a little. Interestingly, he slipped into his natural accent on "Poor Turlygod! Poor Tom!" So I'll be interested to see if he plays all of the Poor Tom stuff in that accent. I always feel like I'm missing some subtext when it comes to the associations various accents have in the UK--since I don't associate Scotland with madness--but I suppose it'll provide a way to distinguish Edgar's asides from his performance. We shall see.

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