tempestsarekind: (geoffrey (not) at work)
"We also learn that Will’s father was gruesomely disemboweled for refusing to renounce his Catholic faith and embrace Protestantism. He periodically appears to Will à la Hamlet’s father’s ghost, one of many references to the Bard’s work that have an Easter egg-y, Shakespeare in Love aspect.


from this review of the TNT show Will:
http://www.vulture.com/2017/07/will-tnt-review.html

I…
I just…

I mean, look. I watched Due South and Slings and Arrows (to say nothing of, y'know, Hamlet), so like, in theory, I really love it when characters talk to the ghosts of their fathers, or others that they care for deeply. I just…don't trust this show to do a decent job of it? There's already so much nonsense piled up in the trailers I've seen; where would they even find the space for an actually illuminating heart-to-heart between Will and his unexpectedly deceased dear old dad?
tempestsarekind: (austen snark is the best snark)
Came to this via Linda Holmes on Twitter, as she's the one who used the phrase "splatter murder" quoted in the piece:
http://www.ew.com/article/2015/08/04/wicked-city-violence

Everything about this article makes me tired. "Oh, our show has graphic violence but it's necessary, because that's the story we're telling." (Well…can we stop telling that story? Seriously, could we maybe just stop with the stories about murderers we're supposed to 'root for' for a while? If Shakespeare couldn't make me like it, you are certainly not going to.*) "Oh, this isn't misogynist violence, because we're women, and there will totally be male victims. I mean, if trends hold, the male victims won't be sexualized while they're murdered, unlike the female victim who is literally murdered while performing oral sex, and we clearly thought that killing a woman first was the way to get everyone's attention and show we mean business, but nope, no misogyny here!" Ugh.

And why does murder always have to be the hook, anyway? Why couldn't this show be about the rock-and-roll culture of the '80s without being about "Bonnie and Clyde-esque serial killers"? That might actually have been something new and different to watch. But no, because a show without murder just isn't worth doing, apparently. I feel like we have reached a point where murder is just the quickest way to make the case that your show is really about something, that it's serious and important and dark and gritty, and everything that's supposed to make for highbrow entertainment these days. Either that, or it's an easy plot device for neatly compartmentalized, episodic shows, the victim's corpse just something for detectives to exchange banter over, to fill out forty-five minutes without requiring the audience to have to care about something from week to week.

*This comment was about Richard III (longtime readers know that I am just spectacularly uninterested in villains), but in context here it also reminds me of the little debate about Macbeth tucked into season 2 of Slings & Arrows - where Geoffrey says that the play teaches us about evil, and Nahum counters that no, it only shows us evil (and, he implies, what's the point of showing that, when we all know it exists?). I think Macbeth does more than that - though only if you direct it properly; it can totally turn into "splatter murder" if you're not careful - but I always think of that debate, because it's such an important question to ask. Are you actually saying something about murder and evil? Or are you just showing it?

...yeah.

Mar. 8th, 2011 12:06 pm
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey (not) at work)
Not even kidding; this is so my life:

http://fyeahenglishmajorarmadillo.tumblr.com/post/3722557355

So last week, when I was watching S2 Slings & Arrows? I wasn't even really listening that hard, when Henry Breedlove starts doing his totemic recitation of Macbeth's dagger speech at rehearsal, because my instinctive reaction to Henry Breedlove is to start up a near-constant stream of caustic muttering about how much I hate him and how he's a total pompous windbag jackwagon. Ahem.

Anyway, even through my not listening--and keep in mind that I don't have the dagger speech memorized--I could hear him say "Proceeding from the heat-oppress'd brain" (instead of "heat-oppressèd," which it ought to be), and I stopped mid-rant, like "...I can't even believe he just said that. I could hear what it ought to be; why can't he?" And then... well, let's draw a veil, but it was not pretty. I debated calling someone so that I could rant over the phone, because my ire needed even more vent than just talking to my television, but I had just enough self-control left to realize that this was not a good idea.

Speaking of television, I spent the weekend watching all of the first season of Fringe, because apparently I've stopped making responsible life choices. OH WELL.

...yeah.

Mar. 8th, 2011 12:06 pm
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey (not) at work)
Not even kidding; this is so my life:

http://fyeahenglishmajorarmadillo.tumblr.com/post/3722557355

So last week, when I was watching S2 Slings & Arrows? I wasn't even really listening that hard, when Henry Breedlove starts doing his totemic recitation of Macbeth's dagger speech at rehearsal, because my instinctive reaction to Henry Breedlove is to start up a near-constant stream of caustic muttering about how much I hate him and how he's a total pompous windbag jackwagon. Ahem.

Anyway, even through my not listening--and keep in mind that I don't have the dagger speech memorized--I could hear him say "Proceeding from the heat-oppress'd brain" (instead of "heat-oppressèd," which it ought to be), and I stopped mid-rant, like "...I can't even believe he just said that. I could hear what it ought to be; why can't he?" And then... well, let's draw a veil, but it was not pretty. I debated calling someone so that I could rant over the phone, because my ire needed even more vent than just talking to my television, but I had just enough self-control left to realize that this was not a good idea.

Speaking of television, I spent the weekend watching all of the first season of Fringe, because apparently I've stopped making responsible life choices. OH WELL.

blech

Feb. 27th, 2011 07:29 pm
tempestsarekind: (world in peril? have some tea)
Coming down with a cold. Mostly this is making me not want to do anything, except for some reason chain-watch episodes of Slings and Arrows S2. (Ooooops.) I don't feel terribly sick (yet, she mutters darkly; I am not convinced that I won't wake up tomorrow feeling wretched), but my brain keeps sliding off of anything that even looks like work or productivity. If I manage to make soup by throwing some frozen veg and flavorings into broth, I will be well pleased.

Also last night I had a dream that involved finding a box of maggots in my apartment, so. This weekend hasn't been the most fun a girl could have.

blech

Feb. 27th, 2011 07:29 pm
tempestsarekind: (world in peril? have some tea)
Coming down with a cold. Mostly this is making me not want to do anything, except for some reason chain-watch episodes of Slings and Arrows S2. (Ooooops.) I don't feel terribly sick (yet, she mutters darkly; I am not convinced that I won't wake up tomorrow feeling wretched), but my brain keeps sliding off of anything that even looks like work or productivity. If I manage to make soup by throwing some frozen veg and flavorings into broth, I will be well pleased.

Also last night I had a dream that involved finding a box of maggots in my apartment, so. This weekend hasn't been the most fun a girl could have.
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey (not) at work)
You guys. Is it just me, or is the whole "Macbeth is the story of an honorable man who is corrupted by power" line really weird? I mean, in my world, guys who decide they want to kill the king after the merest hint that they might become king by doing so, for no reason but "vaulting ambition"--not so much with the "honorable." Simply having not done anything evil yet is not the same thing as actually being honorable or good. And yet people seem to say this a lot about Macbeth. I am confused.

(I keep thinking of Nahum in Slings and Arrows: the idea that Macbeth only shows us evil; it doesn't teach us about it.)

Related, but not really: I...am actually not all that interested in the character of Macbeth. I'm way more interested in Banquo, Malcolm (seriously, what?), and Macduff. I feel like this tells you everything you could possibly need to know about me and tragedy.

I remain open, as always, to seeing a Macbeth that totally changes my mind.
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey (not) at work)
You guys. Is it just me, or is the whole "Macbeth is the story of an honorable man who is corrupted by power" line really weird? I mean, in my world, guys who decide they want to kill the king after the merest hint that they might become king by doing so, for no reason but "vaulting ambition"--not so much with the "honorable." Simply having not done anything evil yet is not the same thing as actually being honorable or good. And yet people seem to say this a lot about Macbeth. I am confused.

(I keep thinking of Nahum in Slings and Arrows: the idea that Macbeth only shows us evil; it doesn't teach us about it.)

Related, but not really: I...am actually not all that interested in the character of Macbeth. I'm way more interested in Banquo, Malcolm (seriously, what?), and Macduff. I feel like this tells you everything you could possibly need to know about me and tragedy.

I remain open, as always, to seeing a Macbeth that totally changes my mind.
tempestsarekind: (mind the gap)
My brain always, always does this when we start nearing the end of the semester: it just--balks, and won't do anything of use. How many things did I have to do yesterday? A LOT. What did I do instead? Watched the last three episodes of S3 Slings & Arrows. Again. (And I teared up at the Bolivians, with their metal sheets and rain sticks making up the storm, because I always do. Because that is what it's about. Their storm, Geoffrey's tempest--magic doesn't need much.)

And over the weekend, when I also could have been doing some of the many things I need to do, I spent a whole day reading Those Who Hunt the Night by Barbara Hambly. And nearly laughing myself off the edge of my bed, on occasion, because apparently I am incredibly amused by snarky, snobbish, aristocratic Spanish vampires. What. (Also: layers. Oh, London, I love the way you do that--all your pockets and hidden places.)

This is not helping me.

Also, I would make a terrible artist--not enough focus--but it doesn't stop me from wanting to create art. (Er. In a very loose, "I made this" kind of way. Not, you know, Art. I have no pretensions to that.) I feel sort of empty, brain-wise and story-wise, and I just want to read and look at and listen to things until I'm filled up again. I want to throw myself into something I love, which is probably why I've been nibbling at the edges of that old story lately. I miss loving things--or no, I miss having something of mine to love.

But I should at least try to be responsible. *sigh*
tempestsarekind: (mind the gap)
My brain always, always does this when we start nearing the end of the semester: it just--balks, and won't do anything of use. How many things did I have to do yesterday? A LOT. What did I do instead? Watched the last three episodes of S3 Slings & Arrows. Again. (And I teared up at the Bolivians, with their metal sheets and rain sticks making up the storm, because I always do. Because that is what it's about. Their storm, Geoffrey's tempest--magic doesn't need much.)

And over the weekend, when I also could have been doing some of the many things I need to do, I spent a whole day reading Those Who Hunt the Night by Barbara Hambly. And nearly laughing myself off the edge of my bed, on occasion, because apparently I am incredibly amused by snarky, snobbish, aristocratic Spanish vampires. What. (Also: layers. Oh, London, I love the way you do that--all your pockets and hidden places.)

This is not helping me.

Also, I would make a terrible artist--not enough focus--but it doesn't stop me from wanting to create art. (Er. In a very loose, "I made this" kind of way. Not, you know, Art. I have no pretensions to that.) I feel sort of empty, brain-wise and story-wise, and I just want to read and look at and listen to things until I'm filled up again. I want to throw myself into something I love, which is probably why I've been nibbling at the edges of that old story lately. I miss loving things--or no, I miss having something of mine to love.

But I should at least try to be responsible. *sigh*

*hearts*

Jan. 14th, 2010 03:22 pm
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey and anna)
I finished re-watching Slings & Arrows last night. I love Anna. And I love Geoffrey and Anna together. You'd think that Anna's brand of harried-and-tense and Geoffrey's brand of stretched-almost-to-snapping might not work together, that they'd bounce off of each other in awkward ways--but what actually happens is that Anna gets sort of calm and competent (well, she's always competent, but it's hard to be calm when dealing with Richard), and Geoffrey sort of settles down a bit, and they have little in-jokes together about Granny Conroy, and Geoffrey actually lets Anna help him, and they are adorable.

So yay. They are my bright spot for the day.

(Also, I have discovered sympathy for Ellen, which was a pleasant surprise.)

*hearts*

Jan. 14th, 2010 03:22 pm
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey and anna)
I finished re-watching Slings & Arrows last night. I love Anna. And I love Geoffrey and Anna together. You'd think that Anna's brand of harried-and-tense and Geoffrey's brand of stretched-almost-to-snapping might not work together, that they'd bounce off of each other in awkward ways--but what actually happens is that Anna gets sort of calm and competent (well, she's always competent, but it's hard to be calm when dealing with Richard), and Geoffrey sort of settles down a bit, and they have little in-jokes together about Granny Conroy, and Geoffrey actually lets Anna help him, and they are adorable.

So yay. They are my bright spot for the day.

(Also, I have discovered sympathy for Ellen, which was a pleasant surprise.)
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey)
One of the Christmas presents I asked for--since my mother still has me make a list every year--was the complete DVD set of Slings & Arrows. With really no cajoling at all, I got my mother to watch the first season with me (her verdict, delivered to someone else on the phone: "really rather cute"). We had an interesting conversation afterwards, in which I discovered that my mother has apparently been telling me for years that she doesn't understand Shakespeare because she has been defining "understand" as "being able to parse every single word in a diagrammatic way." How did I not know this, before? Still, it is useful information for my continued quest to get my mother to appreciate Shakespeare.

The other pleasant discovery here is that I have spent practically no time at all watching Geoffrey Tennant and thinking of Benton Fraser, which I was worried about. But Geoffrey is just so Geoffrey at all times that there's not much room for anyone else to creep in around the edges.

The unpleasant discovery is the same one that happens every time I've watched S&A so far: that I need things outside of grad school to remind me that I actually love Shakespeare. This continues to seem wrong. Not that grad school should be a pleasure cruise, but the fact that I can lose sight, so easily, of the thing that's supposed to be driving me is perhaps more worrisome than any of the other things about grad school that make me worry on a regular basis. Perhaps it's a sign of my unsuitedness to the whole enterprise.
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey)
One of the Christmas presents I asked for--since my mother still has me make a list every year--was the complete DVD set of Slings & Arrows. With really no cajoling at all, I got my mother to watch the first season with me (her verdict, delivered to someone else on the phone: "really rather cute"). We had an interesting conversation afterwards, in which I discovered that my mother has apparently been telling me for years that she doesn't understand Shakespeare because she has been defining "understand" as "being able to parse every single word in a diagrammatic way." How did I not know this, before? Still, it is useful information for my continued quest to get my mother to appreciate Shakespeare.

The other pleasant discovery here is that I have spent practically no time at all watching Geoffrey Tennant and thinking of Benton Fraser, which I was worried about. But Geoffrey is just so Geoffrey at all times that there's not much room for anyone else to creep in around the edges.

The unpleasant discovery is the same one that happens every time I've watched S&A so far: that I need things outside of grad school to remind me that I actually love Shakespeare. This continues to seem wrong. Not that grad school should be a pleasure cruise, but the fact that I can lose sight, so easily, of the thing that's supposed to be driving me is perhaps more worrisome than any of the other things about grad school that make me worry on a regular basis. Perhaps it's a sign of my unsuitedness to the whole enterprise.
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey)
Can anyone remember any mentions of the comedies in the series, besides the production of A Midsummer Night's Dream that kicks the whole thing off? I can't recall any, but it's not like I have the series memorized...
tempestsarekind: (geoffrey)
Can anyone remember any mentions of the comedies in the series, besides the production of A Midsummer Night's Dream that kicks the whole thing off? I can't recall any, but it's not like I have the series memorized...
tempestsarekind: (globe)
Hmm...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/jewish-pupils-boycott-exam-in-shylock-protest-790021.html

I tend to feel that boycotting a work of literature doesn't actually help to defuse whatever makes it troubling in the first place. But I like the way these students and parents handled this: as an individual decision, not as something that needed to be imposed on everyone in the school and possibly even the school district. Listening to your own convictions is one thing; imposing them on someone else is another, and I'm glad to see that they didn't do that here.

In not really related news, a friend of mine declared that the production of a Shakespeare play she'd just seen was "like it was directed by Darren Nichols." Hee.
tempestsarekind: (globe)
Hmm...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/jewish-pupils-boycott-exam-in-shylock-protest-790021.html

I tend to feel that boycotting a work of literature doesn't actually help to defuse whatever makes it troubling in the first place. But I like the way these students and parents handled this: as an individual decision, not as something that needed to be imposed on everyone in the school and possibly even the school district. Listening to your own convictions is one thing; imposing them on someone else is another, and I'm glad to see that they didn't do that here.

In not really related news, a friend of mine declared that the production of a Shakespeare play she'd just seen was "like it was directed by Darren Nichols." Hee.
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
...Which is to say, I finally finished watching Slings & Arrows. Season three was definitely my favorite.

But...I don't like Ellen. I just don't. I think she's selfish and vain, without even being canny enough to make that selfish vanity worth watching. Which makes most of the emotional crisis points one-sided for me, and I'm never on her side.

Anyway, the whole thing got me thinking about King Lear.

comedy tonight! no spoilers for S&A, just random witterings about comedy vs. tragedy )
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
...Which is to say, I finally finished watching Slings & Arrows. Season three was definitely my favorite.

But...I don't like Ellen. I just don't. I think she's selfish and vain, without even being canny enough to make that selfish vanity worth watching. Which makes most of the emotional crisis points one-sided for me, and I'm never on her side.

Anyway, the whole thing got me thinking about King Lear.

comedy tonight! no spoilers for S&A, just random witterings about comedy vs. tragedy )

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