tempestsarekind: (martha at the globe)
I had no idea that the WSC had put up recordings of some of the talks and panels!
http://www.wsc2016.info/world-shakespeare-congress-2016-audio-recordings/

In particular, I can't wait to listen to Adrian Lester's conversation with Ayanna Thompson about playing Othello; I remember several people mentioning it on my Twitter feed as a really great discussion. (And of course, Adrian Lester's Othello was phenomenal…)
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
Just posting so I can find it later: All of the Guardian's Shakespeare Solos videos on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlfYT-Za_x2JuweuLmpYfi1AXhUNKz32g

(Incidentally, listening to Riz Ahmed doing Edmund's "Thou, Nature, art my goddess" soliloquy has made me annoyed all over again with the liberal hand most editors use in applying exclamation marks to the text - precisely because he doesn't exclaim the last line - "Now, gods, stand up for bastards" - but gets quiet instead, and I think it's a very effective choice…but one that a reader who sees an exclamation point might not even consider.)

(I checked, just to be sure - although I have yet to question an exclamation mark in a Shakespeare text and find it there in the earliest editions, but I look forward to that day - and there is no exclamation mark in either the First Quarto or the Folio text. There is an exclamation mark in the Pelican and Folger Digital editions, which are the two that I have on hand at the moment.)
tempestsarekind: (manuscript [little women])
I only discovered this website because I happened to check out a book written by someone who has contributed to the site, so in case you didn't know that Bess of Hardwick's letters were online, either:

http://www.bessofhardwick.org

There's also a lot of supplementary material on her life, and on early modern language and letter-writing, so I plan to spend a lot of time with it once my end-of-year grading is done...
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
Posting for later listening:

‘The two hours’ traffic of our stage’:
Time for Shakespeare

Professor Tiffany Stern

Wednesday 21 May 2014, 6pm-7.15pm
Venue: Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare's Globe, London


https://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/The_Two_Hours_Traffic_of_Our_Stage.cfm
tempestsarekind: (regency house party [s&s])
Sometimes (as you know, Bob) I daydream about writing historical fiction, and sometimes that involves reading about old houses. When that happens, inevitably it turns out that some of the houses I'm reading about are owned and maintained by the National Trust (UK), and so sometimes I look those houses up on the National Trust website.

What I only recently realized is that they also have a whole site for images:

http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/

And they're organized by keyword, so you can look up a specific property - but you could also search, say, "16th," and get back pages upon pages of details of 16th-c architecture: paneling, plasterwork, ceiling decorations, all sorts of things. It's actually a bit overwhelming, but I've been having fun with it, and think it could be a good resource - especially if you, like me, have difficulty with imagining what things looked like.
tempestsarekind: (globe)
Looking for YouTube clips of 1 Henry IV to put up on the course website somehow led me to this:

http://fyjpshakespeare.tumblr.com/

It is a Tumblr devoted to Jamie Parker doing Shakespeare. Yup.

As you were.
tempestsarekind: (trespass sweetly urged)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHoaPLO6Zd8

Sam Troughton as Romeo and Mariah Gale as Juliet, balcony scene, RSC 2011

*sigh*

I don't think I ever wrote about this production, which my friend and I saw during its run at Lincoln Center. (We saw it at the very end of the run; Sam Troughton had injured himself, so Dyfan Dwyfor was playing Romeo. Also, the fire alarm or something kept going off, and Romeo's torch in the final scene wouldn't go out when it was meant to.) It was a frustrating production - not because of the technical hiccups, but because of various odd gimmicks that didn't quite work: Romeo and Juliet were dressed in modern clothes while the rest of the cast wore Elizabethan-style costumes, until the end, when Juliet dons a white Elizabethan wedding dress, because...their tragedy is that they can't overcome the restrictions of their world with their modernity, I guess. Mostly it made me feel like I was watching a Statement rather than a play - same with the way the production opened, where "Romeo" is actually just some poor modern-day tourist who gets sucked into the action of the play after listening to the prologue as a tourist's guide on an iPod. Also the Capulets' ball was weird and "tribal," don't ask me why. It was all a bit disappointing, because I thought Mariah Gale was wonderful a lot of the time, coltish and smart and wry. (She was a brilliant Celia in the season's AYLI, too, really lovely and playful.)

Anyway, this scene was perhaps the best one, because there's not much in it to gimmick up.
tempestsarekind: (don't get clever in latin! [donna])
I didn't know about this, so just in case some of you didn't, either: William Baldwin's William Shakespeare's Small Latine and Lesse Greeke is available as a searchable online edition:

http://durer.press.illinois.edu/baldwin/index.html
tempestsarekind: (don't get clever in latin! [donna])
I didn't know about this, so just in case some of you didn't, either: William Baldwin's William Shakespeare's Small Latine and Lesse Greeke is available as a searchable online edition:

http://durer.press.illinois.edu/baldwin/index.html
tempestsarekind: (elizabeth bennet is amused)
NPR bloggers read Twilight. I giggle.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/03/the_writing_style_of_twilight.html?ft=1&f=1032


(Link via Bookshelves of Doom.)

or this one:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/03/more_twilight_is_bella_a_sympa.html

Which features this comment: "It's interesting that she never asks him things like, 'What was the Great Depression like?'"

I always wish that vampires weren't so much with the blood and the death and all (I'm fairly squeamish, and also not particularly interested in coven politics or what have you*), because I love the idea of people outside of time (you may continue to be unimpressed by this totally obvious comment), and if I *did* write a vampire story, you know the whole thing would be all about the main character going, "Sooo... what was [historical event X] like?" And the vampire would be all, *colossal broody eyeroll*

I'm just saying; it seems like a wasted opportunity.


In totally unrelated news, except that this is also something I just did on the internet: I'm sure I've said this before in comments on someone else's post or something, but it really doesn't bear thinking about, how much my story-writing kinks have been shaped by, of all things, the video to "Take on Me."


*In and of themselves, I hasten to add. It's not a button for me, a theme I'll actively seek out. A good writer could do anything to that basic idea and get me to read it. Provided I could get over my squeamishness.
tempestsarekind: (elizabeth bennet is amused)
NPR bloggers read Twilight. I giggle.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/03/the_writing_style_of_twilight.html?ft=1&f=1032


(Link via Bookshelves of Doom.)

or this one:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/03/more_twilight_is_bella_a_sympa.html

Which features this comment: "It's interesting that she never asks him things like, 'What was the Great Depression like?'"

I always wish that vampires weren't so much with the blood and the death and all (I'm fairly squeamish, and also not particularly interested in coven politics or what have you*), because I love the idea of people outside of time (you may continue to be unimpressed by this totally obvious comment), and if I *did* write a vampire story, you know the whole thing would be all about the main character going, "Sooo... what was [historical event X] like?" And the vampire would be all, *colossal broody eyeroll*

I'm just saying; it seems like a wasted opportunity.


In totally unrelated news, except that this is also something I just did on the internet: I'm sure I've said this before in comments on someone else's post or something, but it really doesn't bear thinking about, how much my story-writing kinks have been shaped by, of all things, the video to "Take on Me."


*In and of themselves, I hasten to add. It's not a button for me, a theme I'll actively seek out. A good writer could do anything to that basic idea and get me to read it. Provided I could get over my squeamishness.

also

Sep. 10th, 2009 08:35 pm
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
A friend sent me this link, so if you have any interest in possibly seeing the National Theatre's production of All's Well That Ends Well in a movie theater in October, check to see if it's playing anywhere near you:

http://nt-online.org/47486/venues-amp-booking/alls-well-that-ends-well-united-states-venues.html

also

Sep. 10th, 2009 08:35 pm
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
A friend sent me this link, so if you have any interest in possibly seeing the National Theatre's production of All's Well That Ends Well in a movie theater in October, check to see if it's playing anywhere near you:

http://nt-online.org/47486/venues-amp-booking/alls-well-that-ends-well-united-states-venues.html

also

Sep. 8th, 2009 02:05 pm
tempestsarekind: (globe)
A friend sent me a link to this DVD press release from Bristol University:

"Explore Jacobean theatre on DVD"
http://www.bris.ac.uk/news/2009/6398.html

"In a full-scale reconstruction of the interior of a Jacobean indoor playhouse lit by tallow and wax candles made using traditional methods, experienced classical actors, dressed in costumes from Shakespeare's Globe, perform scenes from The Duchess of Malfi, Tis Pity She's a Whore, The Changeling, Love's Sacrifice and The Guardian."

Amusingly, Hattie Morahan is one of the featured actors. Awesomely, Jenny Tiramani made the costumes.

There's also a website:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/drama/jacobean/project1.html

also

Sep. 8th, 2009 02:05 pm
tempestsarekind: (globe)
A friend sent me a link to this DVD press release from Bristol University:

"Explore Jacobean theatre on DVD"
http://www.bris.ac.uk/news/2009/6398.html

"In a full-scale reconstruction of the interior of a Jacobean indoor playhouse lit by tallow and wax candles made using traditional methods, experienced classical actors, dressed in costumes from Shakespeare's Globe, perform scenes from The Duchess of Malfi, Tis Pity She's a Whore, The Changeling, Love's Sacrifice and The Guardian."

Amusingly, Hattie Morahan is one of the featured actors. Awesomely, Jenny Tiramani made the costumes.

There's also a website:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/drama/jacobean/project1.html

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