???

Jul. 19th, 2016 06:44 pm
tempestsarekind: (cheveril glove)
…How did I not know that Robert Greene was born in Norwich??? I was looking for information about Norwich's churches, and someone mentioned in passing that he was baptized in St. George's, Tombland. That was one of the churches I visited in 2014! The people there were very nice to the weird American who wanted to know if the angels on the roof beams were original or replacements!

Also, from Wikipedia:

Greene is thought to have attended the Norwich Grammar School, although this cannot be confirmed as enrolment documents for the relevant years are lost.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Greene_(dramatist)

Well, we all know what THAT means! Time for some anti-Norwichians to start doubting that he actually wrote Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay! I mean, apparently we don't even know who his father is, but the candidates are a saddler and a cordwainer, and everyone knows that boys whose fathers work with leather cannot possibly grow up to be playwrights. And "Bacon" is right there in the title, so...
tempestsarekind: (books and flowers)
A brief clip from an upcoming one-hour episode hosted by Dr. Janina Ramirez:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0417x3b

(Aw, Norwich. Seeing the train station gives me all sorts of warm and fuzzy nostalgic feelings about my semester abroad there.)

So those of you who have access to these sorts of things, it airs next Tuesday and looks like it will be available on the website thereafter:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07l6bd0

I had to teach selections from Julian of Norwich once in a survey class, and the whole time I was conscious of not doing a very good job. But I did bring my students hazelnut cookies, so at least I gave them thematically appropriate treats?

ETA: Apparently the presenter has an upcoming book on the subject as well - Julian of Norwich: A Very Brief History - but I didn't want to link to Amazon and can't find another listing. Looks like a September release date.
tempestsarekind: (mind the gap)
Score one more for the OUP blog:

http://blog.oup.com/2013/08/beatles-she-loves-you-23-august-1963/

The choice of the words “yeah, yeah, yeah” also carried an obvious coded ideological meaning for younger fans. When the songwriters returned to McCartney’s Liverpool home the day after Newcastle and played their new creation for his father, he complained about the distinctly American flavor of the language, instead preferring “yes, yes, yes.” In a context where the Beatles’ primary audience (teens) sought to distinguish themselves from their parents and their parents’ generation, the simple use of language could prove a subtle and effective marker. “Yeah, yeah, yeah” evoked both rebellion and an innocence of teen infatuation that parents might protest, but could not ban, especially coming as it did in the context of a song. They might correct their children’s speech, but the words to a song were a kind of excusable poetic extravagance. --Gordon R. Thompson

...huh. who knew?
tempestsarekind: (it is margaret you mourn for)
I find this story weirdly fascinating and a bit sad, somehow:

Thousands of bodies under Bath Abbey threaten its stability

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-23685801

ha ha

Jul. 24th, 2013 01:27 pm
tempestsarekind: (elizabeth bennet is amused)
So Jane Austen is set to become the face of the ten-pound note in 2017 or so:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23424289

That's pretty cool, actually. What's funny about this is the quotation they've chosen for the bill - "I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading!" Fans of Pride and Prejudice might recall that this is said not by some earnest scholar or by a passionate novel reader like Northanger Abbey's Catherine Morland, but by Caroline Bingley, to try to draw Mr. Darcy's attention, while reading a book that she's only chosen because it is the second volume of his.

But I guess Henry Tilney's remarks on taking pleasure in a good novel are too long to fit on currency...
tempestsarekind: (mind the gap)
So I picked up a novel at the bookstore today; I've forgotten the title already but it had something to do with vintage clothing. Anyway, it's supposed to be set in London, but on the first page a character talks about someone's bangs rather than her fringe, and it was like a needle scratching a record. The author is English, so I suspect that this is probably a change made for the US market. Still, what is the point of reading a novel set in London but with US terminology? I wish more publishers would adopt the glossary in the back approach, if they're unwilling to go with the "work it out from context" approach.

This probably makes me some kind of horrible snob, but what can I say? I like getting exposed to different words.

boo

Jul. 14th, 2012 08:22 pm
tempestsarekind: (boy actress)
Sometimes I think Twitter is bad for my mental state: namely, when people are doing things like tweeting about how awesome the Globe's Richard III is, and how we should totally go, which is just MEAN, because I *would* totally go if I could!

Waaaah, why is all the cool Shakespeare stuff happening across the pond, blah blah blah.

In other Globe news, I keep hoping I will hear something about cinema broadcasts of last season's plays, but nothing so far, which is worrisome. I think I was hoping that would happen this summer, in case I have to move someplace without access to such things...
tempestsarekind: (Default)
no, self, you are not allowed to cry at episodes of Antiques Roadshow just because they are set in Norwich. No, not even if they have an adorable schoolboy bringing in a letter from Nelson with a ps from Emma, Lady Hamilton. Not even if the schoolboy is accompanied by his teacher. No.
(stupid England why won't you let me move there)
(also I clearly did not visit enough old buildings when I was in Norwich. one day I'd love to go back.)


Posted via m.livejournal.com.

tempestsarekind: (a broad river)
Oh, these photos. I find these especially haunting because I spent a semester (more like five and a half months) in Norwich, so I've actually been to some of those places. (Like the Bella Pasta on Red Lion street, because I think I ate in all of the Bella Pastas in the city center. It was frequently the only thing open when we wanted to go out for dinner.)

http://www.vintagenorwich.co.uk/2011/03/norwich-blitz-ghosts/

And the Flickr set:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/osborne_villas/sets/72157625836754972/
tempestsarekind: (a broad river)
Oh, these photos. I find these especially haunting because I spent a semester (more like five and a half months) in Norwich, so I've actually been to some of those places. (Like the Bella Pasta on Red Lion street, because I think I ate in all of the Bella Pastas in the city center. It was frequently the only thing open when we wanted to go out for dinner.)

http://www.vintagenorwich.co.uk/2011/03/norwich-blitz-ghosts/

And the Flickr set:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/osborne_villas/sets/72157625836754972/
tempestsarekind: (bonny kate)
"Skeletons unearthed by Gloucester Linkages workmen"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/gloucestershire/8668891.stm

and one whose use of "possibly" in the headline confuses me:
"Medieval African possibly found buried in England"
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hKF47Yx84vAhmpl38iAlVh8aufAAD9FEULHG0

(I mean, he could be possibly medieval, or possibly African, but possibly buried? Presumably that's the part we know for certain.)
tempestsarekind: (bonny kate)
"Skeletons unearthed by Gloucester Linkages workmen"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/gloucestershire/8668891.stm

and one whose use of "possibly" in the headline confuses me:
"Medieval African possibly found buried in England"
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hKF47Yx84vAhmpl38iAlVh8aufAAD9FEULHG0

(I mean, he could be possibly medieval, or possibly African, but possibly buried? Presumably that's the part we know for certain.)
tempestsarekind: (books and flowers)
Okay, how did I not know until today that Katherine Sturtevant had a new book out? I loved At the Sign of the Star--which manages to create a spirited heroine in an historical novel without making her horribly anachronistic--and its sequel, A True and Faithful Narrative.

The new one, The Brothers Story, is going on the library request list right away.

I also discovered that the bookstore *does* still carry BBC History magazine and History Now, and there was a giant green man on the cover of the former--one of the famous roof bosses from Norwich Cathedral, so now I'm all nostalgic. But the author of the article has a book on green men coming out soon, so that's useful knowledge for the future.
http://www.historytoday.com/MainArticle.aspx?m=33897&amid=30306150
http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780747807841&view=print
tempestsarekind: (books and flowers)
Okay, how did I not know until today that Katherine Sturtevant had a new book out? I loved At the Sign of the Star--which manages to create a spirited heroine in an historical novel without making her horribly anachronistic--and its sequel, A True and Faithful Narrative.

The new one, The Brothers Story, is going on the library request list right away.

I also discovered that the bookstore *does* still carry BBC History magazine and History Now, and there was a giant green man on the cover of the former--one of the famous roof bosses from Norwich Cathedral, so now I'm all nostalgic. But the author of the article has a book on green men coming out soon, so that's useful knowledge for the future.
http://www.historytoday.com/MainArticle.aspx?m=33897&amid=30306150
http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780747807841&view=print
tempestsarekind: (don't get clever in latin! [donna])
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/science/living/article7042984.ece

(from In the Medieval Middle)

There are days when I think I went to grad school just to have access to academic libraries, and today is one of those days: I am printing out the article on this topic right now, because my institution has online access to Antiquity. Yay.

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