tempestsarekind: (hamlet--though you can fret me)
A little look at the history of Yorick's skull in Hamlet, on the eve of Andrew Scott's first performance of the title role at the Almeida:

Alas, poor Yorick! The shocking life of theatre's greatest skull
https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2017/feb/16/andrew-scott-hamlet-skull

And here's a tidbit about David Tennant and Andre Tchaikowsky (the skull who played Yorick for a while, until he was supposedly replaced by a prop):

it wasn’t until David Tennant played Hamlet in 2009 that the skull was finally used in a live performance, which provoked a minor media frenzy. Even though the company claimed that the prop had been replaced by a replica, so as not to “distract” audiences, artistic director Gregory Doran admitted months later that Tchaikowsky had in fact starred alongside Tennant throughout.


I don't know how I missed that last part of the story!
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
I must have written this the day after I saw the Cumberbatch Hamlet, but then I got distracted by writing a blog post instead, and never came back to finish this. Anyway, I just found it on my computer, so for completeness' sake:

Further thoughts, about Benedict Cumberbatch this time – or at least about his Hamlet. Hamlet thoughts )
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
Samsung has teamed up with the Royal Shakespeare Company to create an app that allows you to "remix" Shakespeare:

http://mobilemarketingmagazine.com/samsung-rsc-shakespeare-app

"The app, called RE:Shakespeare, includes interactive games and videos and hopes to help students appreciate Shakespeare’s plays by breaking up long scenes into bite-sized chunks that can be reinterpreted, remixed and performed in unique ways.

The app is ‘hosted’ by RSC ambassador David Tennant, and also features actress Tamsin Greig, director Iqbal Khan, beatboxing artist Shlomo, and rapper and poet Akala. Users can create their own Dubsmash-style music videos, mixing in Shlomo’s beats with Shakespearean verse to create tracks.

The app also enables users to perform on a virtual stage with 360-degree immersive video, shot on the Royal Shakespeare Theatre’s stage at Stratford-upon-Avon, and provides pupils with tools to get to grips with Shakespearean language."


All I know is that the descriptive video made me feel old. Who are these people?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehLGvlYQ9vM
tempestsarekind: (berowne is perplexed [dt])
Found in the wild yet again on a book cover:

Shakespeare and Costume, edited by Patricia Lennox and Bella Mirabella (Arden Shakespeare, publication date April 23, 2015)
http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/shakespeare-and-costume-9781472525079/

It includes a symposium discussion featuring Jenny Tiramani, too, so that's something to look forward to...
tempestsarekind: (hamlet--though you can fret me)
So I saw the Greg Doran/David Tennant Richard II cinema broadcast last night. It was pretty good stuff. :)

(There are too many people on my flist too well-versed [so to speak] in the history plays for me to feel like I have anything about the play worth saying, but I thought I ought to register my enjoyment all the same. I didn't care for Bolingbroke, though, it must be said. He was kind of shouty and boring?)
tempestsarekind: (Default)
So I spent an hour yesterday squeaking at my television in delight about David Tennant's face, and so cannot possibly evaluate the Hamlet episode objectively. (He geeked out over the Bad Quarto, you guys! How do I resist that?) The Tempest episode mainly made me want to watch the Taymor film, which I have so far not been inclined to do. (I also find the whole 'farewell to the theatre' narrative slightly irritating, and so am not objective about that, either.)


Posted via m.livejournal.com.

tempestsarekind: (ten and martha)
Some thoughts on The Decoy Bride. I was so puzzled by it that I actually watched it twice, the second time after my weekend visiting a friend, and the second time I liked it a lot better. Kelly McDonald and David Tennant are sweet together, and unlike the case in some romcoms, they actually have a fair number of scenes together, so why did the film gel so poorly/oddly?

cut for length and spoilers )

*giggle*

May. 1st, 2012 04:00 pm
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
In his essay on playing Touchstone for the Players of Shakespeare series, David Tennant remarks prophetically that he was pleased with his costume because it seemed like the right decision to put Touchstone into traditional fool's garb, "and anyway I've always liked long coats..."

(I am irrationally pleased by the several ways in which this icon is appropriate for this post.)
tempestsarekind: (berowne is perplexed [dt])
David Tennant is playing Malvolio in a BBC Radio 3 production of Twelfth Night on April 22:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01g4vgj

There are also some Globe actors on board: Naomi Frederick (Rosalind in the production of AYLI with Jack Laskey and Jamie Parker) is Viola, and Trystan Gravelle (Berowne in LLL) is Sebastian. They're also doing R&J the week after, with Trystan Gravelle as Romeo.
tempestsarekind: (eleven and amy)
I'd forgotten that I put together a "year in review" post about things I loved in 2011, and then never posted it because the list seemed so short, and I wanted to see if anything else came to mind. It wasn't a fantastic year for falling in love with new things, I guess. I read 38 books, which I know is barely a sneeze to some of you speed-readers out there, but is a decent sum for me. And I quite enjoyed quite a few of them. 2011 was the year that I finally read A Room With a View (which I liked, but perhaps not as much as Howards End) and We Have Always Lived in the Castle; and I read the odd little book The Brontes Go to Woolworths, and I liked Connie Willis' Blackout and All Clear, and Cat Valente's Fairyland. But I didn't read or watch anything much new that I felt the need to buttonhole people about, and that's generally my standard for a good media year. I didn't have a due South this year, or a Tamsin. Still, what there is, come see. (I have been spending *way* too much time with As You Like It lately, seriously.)

Year in review 2011

--THE PONDS. I've found myself saying lately that "all of my feelings are Pond feelings," and it's perfectly true. Doctor Who is beloved to me generally, of course, but this year has especially belonged to Amy and Rory. I love that their relationship has developed in s6, that Amy is more comfortable showing tenderness to Rory, that they are a love story in every universe. And I love that their relationship with the Doctor has grown and changed, too, that their bonds have deepened and been tested, and that they remain a strange, wonderful family. (*Christmas special flail*)

--honorable mention to Matt Smith, of course, whose face still exists and therefore has delighted me all season. Special kudos for his double act in "The Almost People," which I'm pretty sure I referred to at the time as giddy-making. And oh, that scene with Alfie (aka Stormageddon) in "Closing Time"...I don't want always to have Beat Up on Ten Corner, and that isn't really even how I mean it. But Eleven faces his death with the ability to focus on the good, to remember what he's loved as well as - or more than - what he's lost, and I'm so grateful for that. It's become a commonplace to talk about the way that Matt can suddenly turn so old in scenes like that one, but I think it's partly to do with the way he manages to make one believe that he's actually capable of reflecting on hundreds of years of experiences - sometimes to be made weary by them, but more often to be grateful, even if that gratitude comes with a tearful edge.

--another honorable mention for "The Doctor's Wife." Because Neil Gaiman wrote a love letter to the TARDIS, and it was beautiful. Hello, TARDIS. It was so very nice to meet you.

--And just one more for "Good Night," one of the minisodes on the S6 DVDs (aka the one where Amy and Eleven go get timey-wimey ice cream). This encapsulated so much of what I love about the Moffat era so far: its insistence on the benevolence of time, even in the face of its tragedies, but a benevolence that stems from the way that people orient themselves toward others, and choose to care for each other, as much as from time itself. (I still love the fact that ultimately they don't go back in time to save Vincent van Gogh, but to befriend him. Even though they can't change his fate, they can change his life.) The Doctor can't fix Amy's life; he can't make time travel make any sense. But he can give her the gift of perspective, a little touch of reparation for a childhood sorrow that becomes an answer for her current dilemma. In the face of the inexplicable and the unfathomable, this Doctor puts his faith in the grace of the moment. "Cheer up. Have an ice cream."

--going to London this summer with my friend. Also, theater-stalking several favorite actors: David Tennant, Samuel Barnett and Jamie Parker, and Arthur Darvill.

--(this gets its own line) the Summer of Jamie. This began in London, watching him and Sam in R&G Are Dead, which was like magic (oh, my boys). Then his brilliant turn as Hal in 1 and 2H4, which made me feel so much for Hal for maybe the first time: he was so immediate and in the moment, really piecing together his princehood through the course of the plays. And it's no exaggeration to say that the knowledge that he's playing Henry in H5 has brightened my life so much over the last few months: I so want to know where that journey will have taken him.

--very honorable mention for Roger Allam, who made me enjoy Falstaff. I did not know such a thing was possible.

--Passenger by Lisa Hannigan. I discovered this CD during the lees of the year, and it's quirky and enveloping. (I also bought a copy for my high-school Spanish teacher, as a Christmas present.)

--The Hour. Despite a sad paucity of Jamie Parker, this series was engrossing, and I rather fell in love with the rich textures of cloth it put up on the screen. (so much tweed. <3) /shallow There's also the relationship between Bel and Freddie, which I loved: I don't even necessarily need them to get together romantically (though because I have seen television before, I'm pretty sure they will), so long as they remain so important to each other. They're comfortable together, in a way they can't be with anyone else - particularly Bel, who spends so much time protecting herself emotionally, for all that she's reckless sexually when it comes to Hector, wanting to play by the same rules as men, who can have affairs and not be thought the worse for it. With Freddie, she gets to be both playful and childlike, and motherly and nurturing - because it's also always clear that Freddie couldn't make it without her; he's completely fearless, and he also doesn't have enough sense to come in out of the rain: he's got no instinct for self-preservation, literal or social. They've grown up together: she's proud of how she's molded him, and exasperated by his stubborn obliviousness; he knows her intimate habits, and can be scathing and unfair when he thinks she's playing it safe. It's interesting to watch them both try to grow past that old relationship they share, and yet to continue to need to come back to it. And it occurs to me, incidentally, that the way I respond to their relationship, especially when compared to my response to Bel/Hector, is completely telling about my priorities: the relationship that's supposed to be hot-and-heavy, all passion first and foremost, never interests me like the ones where two people find a resting place or haven in each other.

--Luther s2. I didn't love it quite as much as s1 (needs more Alice!), but I would watch the "Luther does domestic and awkwardly protective" show all day, every day. He's so bad at caring for himself that it's startling to see that he knows the offhand, ordinary routine of caring for someone else - not just protecting someone else, because that's part of his job, but the daily activities of cooking breakfast and nagging someone to go to the job center. It makes me wonder about or imagine the possibility of some occluded history of kindness in his life: who took care of him, when he was young and needed it? Did anyone?

tee hee.

Aug. 16th, 2011 02:21 pm
tempestsarekind: (hamlet--though you can fret me)
I was away this weekend, so when I called my mother for our usual chat, she'd made a list of things she wanted to remember to say to me. Two of them were fairly typical things, but the third was, "Was that your Doctor Who in the commercials for Fright Night?" I laughed and said, yes, that was David.

I don't know how it happened, but somehow or other I have made my mother the sort of person who recognizes David Tennant from a briefer-than-brief flash of his face in a random commercial. Hee.

tee hee.

Aug. 16th, 2011 02:21 pm
tempestsarekind: (hamlet--though you can fret me)
I was away this weekend, so when I called my mother for our usual chat, she'd made a list of things she wanted to remember to say to me. Two of them were fairly typical things, but the third was, "Was that your Doctor Who in the commercials for Fright Night?" I laughed and said, yes, that was David.

I don't know how it happened, but somehow or other I have made my mother the sort of person who recognizes David Tennant from a briefer-than-brief flash of his face in a random commercial. Hee.
tempestsarekind: (all the world's a stage)
Right. So. Here are my notes on Much Ado. I've left out one or two of the more rambling asides that had nothing to do with the production, and I've moved a paragraph or two so that elements are grouped more naturally (as opposed to falling wherever I happened to remember them and write them down), but basically this is just transcribed from what I wrote once we'd gotten back to our hotel room after the show. So, er, sorry about that. But I did warn you.

Much Ado About Nothing, Wyndham’s Theatre, London
starring David Tennant, Catherine Tate
17 June 2011

cut for length and ridiculous fangirling )

yeah.

Feb. 13th, 2011 05:44 pm
tempestsarekind: (ten and martha)
Last night I watched How to Train Your Dragon, so now I've seen a whopping one film that's up for an Oscar this year. I liked it. Also, David Tennant has a handful of lines in it, which is not really relevant to anything except that I...kind of went back afterward to see if I could pick them out, or if I was right about the ones I suspected of being him--mostly because I wanted to see if I could. I feel very confident that he is the second guy to yell "Get inside!" at Hiccup early on, and the guy who yells "We've done it!" at the end of a battle scene. I'm also pretty sure that he's the Viking who says "Right!" and then mumbles something about getting to the far side of the island, shortly after this. I suspect him of having a line at the end of the film (something like "Hey look, it's Hiccup!"), but don't feel as confident in that particular assertion.

...And this is a demonstration of me being pathetic. Ta da.
tempestsarekind: (berowne is perplexed [dt])
I'm sure you all already know about this announcement, but just in case: David Tennant and Catherine Tate are going to be in a production of Much Ado About Nothing together!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12142161

This is not assuaging my sense that everything I want exists across the pond, you know.
tempestsarekind: (berowne is perplexed [dt])
I'm sure you all already know about this announcement, but just in case: David Tennant and Catherine Tate are going to be in a production of Much Ado About Nothing together!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12142161

This is not assuaging my sense that everything I want exists across the pond, you know.
tempestsarekind: (peddlers of bombast)
Thinking, as one does, about Hamlet. I still haven't had a chance to think through the NT Live broadcast beyond the scribbles I took during intermission and when I got home (and probably won't, now). I thought Rory Kinnear was quite good, but--weirdly (or maybe not so weirdly)--he tended to lose me, just a tiny bit, on the soliloquies. I don't want to be that girl who always goes, "But when David Tennant did it," but it is the most recent other Hamlet that I've seen, and that was one of the things I really loved about Tennant's performance; he made the soliloquies really feel like snatched moments of release, carefully hidden from the outside world. I feel like I can tell a lot about the tone of a Hamlet based on the first soliloquy ("O that this too, too solid flesh would melt"), whether a Hamlet starts off as a rational, furious, ironic observer, or an emotional mess--and for whatever reason, I tend to prefer the latter (though of course, any one note played monotonously is bad, and of course I don't mean that Hamlet should be constantly flinging himself into corners and sobbing; there is awareness and observation mixed in even with that brokenness). So I thought Rory Kinnear, who did the former, was really good, but I'm not sure I loved him, or grieved for him the way I do with more broken Hamlets. (But when David Tennant did it...for example, that helpless little lilt in his voice on the word "awry" during "To be or not to be," ["And enterprises of great pith and moment / With this regard their currents turn awry / And lose the name of action"] breaks my heart every time; he's so trapped, and he's always horribly aware of it, and yet there's nothing he can see his way clear to do about it.)

Also, this production cut out "Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man / As e'er my conversation coped withal..." Boo--my inner Horatio fangirl thinks this is not on.

Things I really liked, though (basically pulled from the aforementioned scribbles):

meet it is I set it down... )
tempestsarekind: (peddlers of bombast)
Thinking, as one does, about Hamlet. I still haven't had a chance to think through the NT Live broadcast beyond the scribbles I took during intermission and when I got home (and probably won't, now). I thought Rory Kinnear was quite good, but--weirdly (or maybe not so weirdly)--he tended to lose me, just a tiny bit, on the soliloquies. I don't want to be that girl who always goes, "But when David Tennant did it," but it is the most recent other Hamlet that I've seen, and that was one of the things I really loved about Tennant's performance; he made the soliloquies really feel like snatched moments of release, carefully hidden from the outside world. I feel like I can tell a lot about the tone of a Hamlet based on the first soliloquy ("O that this too, too solid flesh would melt"), whether a Hamlet starts off as a rational, furious, ironic observer, or an emotional mess--and for whatever reason, I tend to prefer the latter (though of course, any one note played monotonously is bad, and of course I don't mean that Hamlet should be constantly flinging himself into corners and sobbing; there is awareness and observation mixed in even with that brokenness). So I thought Rory Kinnear, who did the former, was really good, but I'm not sure I loved him, or grieved for him the way I do with more broken Hamlets. (But when David Tennant did it...for example, that helpless little lilt in his voice on the word "awry" during "To be or not to be," ["And enterprises of great pith and moment / With this regard their currents turn awry / And lose the name of action"] breaks my heart every time; he's so trapped, and he's always horribly aware of it, and yet there's nothing he can see his way clear to do about it.)

Also, this production cut out "Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man / As e'er my conversation coped withal..." Boo--my inner Horatio fangirl thinks this is not on.

Things I really liked, though (basically pulled from the aforementioned scribbles):

meet it is I set it down... )
tempestsarekind: (ophelia)
While I was watching bits and pieces of all those Hamlets, my mind snagged on a bit of Ophelia's description of Hamlet when he bursts in on her as she's sewing in her closet:

And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell
To speak of horrors
,--he comes before me.

And there's Hamlet, acting like his father, searching for yet another mode of action. So I just wondered--has anyone ever done a production of Hamlet in which Hamlet borrows some gesture of the ghost's, here, and uses it with Ophelia, in much the same way that David Tennant's Hamlet borrows the Player King's Pyrrhus-gesture of raising a knife over his head in both hands, during both "O what a rogue and peasant slave am I" and "Now might I do it, pat"? You could do this quite easily in film, in flashback; I'm not sure how you'd do it on stage, unless Ophelia were to echo Hamlet's echoed gesture, either on her own self or on Polonius. Which would work, I think. They're all borrowing from one another, anyway--trying to figure out how to behave in this broken kingdom.

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